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AKA: Silencers

The Men in Black are a group of individuals who are said to wear black suits and drive and fly around in unmarked black cars and helicopters. They go about threatening people who have claimed to have witnessed UFOs into not talking about what they witnessed. The very first occurrence of MIB was traced to a man named Albert K. Bender. He was the editor of a flying saucer publication called the "Space Review" In the October 1953 issue he placed an announcement stating that he had come across information that would solve the flying saucer mystery but they could not print it because they were ordered not to. They then ended the announcement warning others in saucer work to be "very cautious" they then stopped their publications. Later in an interview Bender stated that "; three men wearing dark suits" had ordered him to stop publishing flying saucer material, and that he had complied with the order because he had been "scared to death" of them. He later published a book called "Flying Saucers and the Three Men in Black"



As there seems to be quite a bit of interest in this forum concerning the existence and or origins of the mysterious MIBs (Men In Black), I thought I would provide you with some information which should dispel some of the wild claims made by the likes of John Keel and many others on Ufology's fringe. Much of this information was obtained from an article by William Moore published in 1993.

The MIB lore began in 1956 with Gary Barker and his book "They Knew Too Much About Flying Saucers". Barker, who wrote pulp magazines and articles on the subject of MIBs, was also known as a "spoofer" whose work was later carried on by his friend John Keel.

Although the existence and clandestent activities of these MIBs have been greatly exaggerated, they do none the less exist and furthermore operate out of a terrestrial base, which is located in Fort Belvior, VA. These MIBs are not the result of some form of cross breeding experiment on the part of an alien race for the purpose of monitoring our activities here on earth. They are in fact the result of the US government's need for intelligence gathering.

The existence of these MIBs, or more appropriately the agents of the AFSAC (Air Force Special Activities Centre) dates back to the early 50s or possibly as early as the late 40's. Originally designated the 1006th Air Intelligence Service Squadron, this unit has undergone frequent name changes in order to obscure their existence and more recently to lessen the accessibility of information requested under FOIA. Other known designations carried by this unit have been the 1127th Field Activities Group, and the 7602nd Air Intelligence Group.

Where as SIGINT is the collection of signal intelligence, and IMINT is the collection of image intelligence, the AFSAC is primarily devoted to the collection of HUMINT, intelligence obtained directly form human sources. And the agents of AFSAC are experts at obtaining this information, all be it in an unorthodox and unscrupulous manner. These agents were selected for their talents such as breaking and entering, safe cracking, character impersonation, pathological lying, etc. and used these talents to obtain information from unsuspecting citizens.

Although these agents nearly fit the mould of Barker's MIBs, it is very likely that they adopted these characteristics to make themselves more ominous and intimidating, there by taking advantage of the paranoia it invoked. In J. Keel's latest article in Fate magazine, he describes a situation where reports were made to him of MIB activity, which fit false information he had disseminated. Keel believes that these MIBs are following his lead and acting in a manner befitting his interpretation. Well, is it not possible that the reports made to him were false and were made up by people who had read his MIB stories?

The point of this is, don't take John Keel's (or mine for that matter) words as irrefutable. Be sensible, and take Occar's advice, make it simple and don't look for other worldly explanations without searching in your back yard first.

Source: Unknown

====

Beginning in the late 1950s, reports surfaced of strange men arriving, unannounced - sometimes alone, sometimes in pairs or in trios - at the homes of particular UFO witnesses, usually before they had reported their sightings to anyone. The MiB, who often seemed to know more than a stranger should know about the witnesses, cautioned them against reporting their sightings or CLOSE ENCOUNTERS.

MiB often arrive driving black cars and typically walk with a strange limp. They speak in mechanical monotones or annoying singsongs, wear black suits and black shoes, and convey an eerie, otherworldly aura. This popular element of UFO lore inspired the comic-book series Men in Black, which in turn spawned two feature films [1 | 2] and an animated TV series.

Bizarre Behaviour.

What complicates the mystery further is that while some MIB visits appear to be entirely credible - the only grounds for suspicion being a false identity claim or unaccountable access to private information - others are riddled with implausible details.

One extraordinary case followed a UFO abduction of two men that occurred in October 1975, at the height of UFO activity in the State of Maine, USA. Nearly a year after the incident, on September 11th 1976, the investigating psychiatrist, Dr Herbert Hopkins, was working alone at home when he received a telephone call from a man purporting to be a UFO investigator. The stranger asked if he could visit the doctor and, within less than a minute appeared at the back door. I saw no car, and even if he did have a car he could not possibly have gotten to my house from any pay phone, Dr Hopkins later observed.

His visitor advised Dr Hopkins to destroy all his records on the abduction case. But when the conversation turned to UFOs, Dr Hopkins noticed that the stranger’s speech began to falter. Shakily, the man stood up and, stumbling towards the door, excused himself, saying, ˜My energy is running low... must go now.

It was only after he had gone that Dr Hopkins registered his visitor’s odd appearance. He wore an old-fashioned black suit, which looked brand new. He was also completely bald and had no eyelashes or eyebrows. Stranger still, he was wearing lipstick.

Paranormal Link?

Dr Hopkins experience is one of the most reliable and detailed accounts of an MIB visit. As some aspect of his story border on the absurd, it also presents the mystery at its most bizarre. Some researchers have observed that the behaviour and appearance of many MIBs seem to have a surreal quality reminiscent of a dream sequence. This suggests that MIBs may not be an entirely physical phenomenon - a view supported by those who are convinced that MIBs are ETs.

Other investigators have tried to find a psychological answer to the MIB phenomenon. American UFO researcher Dr Alvin Lawson notes that all alien figures linked to UFO sightings - and the vast majority of reports, especially in the US, describe MIBs as foreign-looking - seem to correspond to the archetypes that psychologist Carl Jung proposed lie buried in everyone’s unconscious imagery. Could it be that a real visitor triggers the victim’s imagination to draw upon this well of imagery and create a bizarre, dream-like sequence of events? The real enigma for Dr Lawson is not so much what the victim sees but what triggers the archetypal images in the first place - a puzzle to which he has no solution.

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Lee Broadstock - Truth Seekers Midlands